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Monday, 06 July 2020 00:00

One symptom that is associated with poor circulation is cold feet. This can be a result of limited blood flow, and it may be indicative of serious health issues. Additional signs of this condition can include a tingling or numbing sensation, increased blood pressure, and the feet may feel heavy. There are several reasons why poor circulation may develop. These can consist of being obese, leading a sedentary lifestyle, and having medical conditions such as diabetes. Research has indicated it is beneficial to perform low-impact exercises that can consist of yoga, swimming, and walking. Patients have found relief when compression stockings are worn which may help to increase circulation. If you have symptoms of poor circulation in your feet, it is strongly advised that you are under the care of a podiatrist who can help you to manage this condition.

While poor circulation itself isn’t a condition; it is a symptom of another underlying health condition you may have. If you have any concerns with poor circulation in your feet contact Dr. Blake Zobell of Utah. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Poor Circulation in the Feet

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) can potentially lead to poor circulation in the lower extremities. PAD is a condition that causes the blood vessels and arteries to narrow. In a linked condition called atherosclerosis, the arteries stiffen up due to a buildup of plaque in the arteries and blood vessels. These two conditions can cause a decrease in the amount of blood that flows to your extremities, therefore resulting in pain.

Symptoms

Some of the most common symptoms of poor circulation are:

  • Numbness
  • Tingling
  • Throbbing or stinging pain in limbs
  • Pain
  • Muscle Cramps

Treatment for poor circulation often depends on the underlying condition that causes it. Methods for treatment may include insulin for diabetes, special exercise programs, surgery for varicose veins, or compression socks for swollen legs.

As always, see a podiatrist as he or she will assist in finding a regimen that suits you. A podiatrist can also prescribe you any needed medication. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Richfield and Ephraim, Utah. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment of Poor Blood Circulation in the Feet
Monday, 29 June 2020 00:00

A broken ankle is a fracture that occurs in the tibia, fibia, or the talus, which is the bone that connects the leg to the heel.  While broken ankles are usually caused by a twisting or turning motion, stress fractures can occur when the legs and feet are overused.  While there are many types of unique fractures, there are four that are most common. The bimalleolar ankle fracture occurs when the knob on the inside of the ankle is fractured. A trimalleolar fracture involves the medial (inside), lateral (outside), and posterior (back) malleoli all breaking.  Medical malleous ankle fractures occur in the lower portion of the tibia, and a pilon fracture occurs on the weight bearing roof of the ankle. Fractures can also be displaced, meaning bones are out of their normal alignment, or non displaced, which are bones that are aligned but still broken. While these are the most common fractures, each break is unique, so it is important to consult with a podiatrist for more detailed information about your injury and a treatment plan towards recovery. 

Broken ankles need immediate treatment. If you are seeking treatment, contact Dr. Blake Zobell from Utah. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet. 

Broken Ankles
A broken ankle is experienced when a person fractures their tibia or fibula in the lower leg and ankle area. Both of these bones are attached at the bottom of the leg and combine to form what we know to be our ankle.

When a physician is referring to a break of the ankle, he or she is usually referring to a break in the area where the tibia and fibula are joined to create our ankle joint. Ankles are more prone to fractures because the ankle is an area that suffers a lot of pressure and stress. There are some obvious signs when a person experiences a fractured ankle, and the following symptoms may be present.

Symptoms of a Fractured Ankle

  • Excessive pain when the area is touched or when any pressure is placed on the ankle
  •  Swelling around the area
  •  Bruising of the area
  • Area appears to be deformed

If you suspect an ankle fracture, it is recommended to seek treatment as soon as possible. The sooner you have your podiatrist diagnose the fracture, the quicker you’ll be on the way towards recovery.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Richfield and Ephraim, Utah. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about All About Broken Ankle
Friday, 26 June 2020 00:00

Want to wear open toe shoes again? ...Special occasion? Vacation? ...You don't need an excuse to have beautiful nails.

Monday, 22 June 2020 00:00

The condition that is known as an ingrown toenail can happen as a result of stubbing your toe. It may cause the nail to grow into the surrounding skin, which can cause pain and discomfort. Additional reasons this ailment can happen include trimming the toenails incorrectly, or wearing shoes that are too snug. Patients have found mild relief when the nail is soaked in warm water, as this may help to soften the edges of the nail. If you have an ingrown toenail, it is strongly suggested that you consult with a podiatrist who can treat the nail before it becomes infected, and offer you correct treatment remedies.

Ingrown toenails may initially present themselves as a minor discomfort, but they may progress into an infection in the skin without proper treatment. For more information about ingrown toenails, contact Dr. Blake Zobell of Utah. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails are caused when the corner or side of a toenail grows into the soft flesh surrounding it. They often result in redness, swelling, pain, and in some cases, infection. This condition typically affects the big toe and may recur if it is not treated properly.

Causes

  • Improper toenail trimming
  • Genetics
  • Improper shoe fitting
  • Injury from pedicures or nail picking
  • Abnormal gait
  • Poor hygiene

You are more likely to develop an ingrown toenail if you are obese, have diabetes, arthritis, or have any fungal infection in your nails. Additionally, people who have foot or toe deformities are at a higher risk of developing an ingrown toenail.

Symptoms

Some symptoms of ingrown toenails are redness, swelling, and pain. In rare cases, there may be a yellowish drainage coming from the nail.

Treatment

Ignoring an ingrown toenail can have serious complications. Infections of the nail border can progress to a deeper soft-tissue infection, which can then turn into a bone infection. You should always speak with your podiatrist if you suspect you have an ingrown toenail, especially if you have diabetes or poor circulation.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Richfield and Ephraim, Utah. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Ingrown Toenail Care
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